Comfort High School

Skip to main content
Teacher and Coach Billy Nabours » Home

Home

Billy Nabours
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 1998 - Present: Comfort High School – Comfort ISD Classes Taught: U.S. History; Gov't/Eco; Kendall County Social Studies Teacher of the Year 2007 as selected by local chapter Daughters of the American Revolution District Champion; UIL Social Studies/Current Events & Issues Team Coach; Coached two-time state qualifier in UIL Current Events and Issues;
Head Boys’& Girls’Cross Country; Head Girls’ Track & Field; District CC Champions (BOYS): 2014, 2007, 2006, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000; Runnerups:2015, 2012, 2010, 1999; District CC Champions (GIRLS): 2008, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2001; Runnerups: 2016, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2006, 2002, 2000; State CC Meet Team Qualifiers (BOYS): 2006, 2004, 2001; Individual Qualifier: 2012, 2010, 2006, 2004; State CC Meet Team Qualifiers (GIRLS): 2003; State CC Meet Individual Qualifier: 2016, 2015, 2013, 2001;District Track & Field Champions: 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000; District Track & Field Runnerups: 2014, 2013,2009, 2007, 2006; State Track & Field Qualifiers: 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013,2012 ,2011, 2010, 2008, 2003, 2002; Region-8 rep. for selections of TGCA 2A All-State Track & Field Team/All-State Cross Country Team 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2008;2007, 2005; Assistant Principal Comfort High School 2002-2003; Assistant for regional qualifier, volleyball 1999; Assistant for playoff basketball teams 2001, 2002; Member Campus Leadership Team 2006-2007; Member, Site Based Committee & Campus Crisis Committee 1999-2000;
EDUCATION: Schreiner University, 1998 to 2000 ---- Masters Degree in Education; Southwest Texas State University, 1977 to 1979 ----B.S.Ed., Major: Journalism Minor: History; Temple Junior College, 1975 to 1977 ---- Associate of Arts Degree; Billy Nabours



    

Comfort High School U.S. Government, U.S. History 2017 --

Nation of Room 152

MISSION STATEMENT: Buy into the Nation of Room 152 Social Studies Program and Academic Excellence Policy. Believe that what is being done is the correct way of doing things. Have an excellent work ethic and make sure nobody outworks you ---- EVER! Go as hard as you can everyday and get the most out of yourself for the good of Academic Excellence. Stay MENTALLY TOUGH! You can learn a lot about character under stress than anywhere else in life. Remember it is a right to get a public education, but a privilege to achieve at the highest levels of academics.

 

‘DO RIGHT LIST:’ A ‘Do Right” list will be implemented and used in Room 152 Social Studies to, hopefully, encourage, motivate, and prompt students to minimize negative discipline issues, maximize positive achievement, and allow for a positive learning environment; Room 152 will institute a point policy (think of it as bonus pay in addition to the salary of grades you are earning) with those points equating to another extra grade, being used to replace a lowest grade, earning an extra hall pass, etc... and other rewards to be determined

Comfort Room 152 ‘Do Rights’

(This is also known as the Good Citizenship Code and will be

listed in the gradebook under Citizenship)

1) Do display Commitment to Passing and  to earning the best grades possible, not only in social studies, but in all classes -- students will be awarded the following points at the end of each 6 weeks grading periods for letter grades and doing well in other academic classes, not only Social Studies; This is because being a solid contributor and striver elsewhere is comparable to  being a solid contributor and striver in the "real world" of American Society (However, athletics will not be part of the academic equation formula, but read farther) Do Be A Hard Worker and make this known to your teachers and your classmates by your actions, not your words. Get excited about what you are doing! Have fun working hard!

Point Totals will be awarded as follows for letter grades each 3 weeks -- All A's = 30; A's and B's = 20; Passing all classes = 10

2) Do get involved in any, and as many extracurricular activities as possible -- Most data points out that extracurricular students usually become the most positive contributors and  leaders in society; 5 Points awarded each 6 weeks for each extracurricular group a student is involved in

3) Do not engage in excessive absences at all, and no absences if at all possible; Do Be on time for class; Students/Employees who engage in excessive absences cannot be counted on to achieve the highest level of success -- academic or otherwise -- because they cannot be depended on in any positive way to contribute to class or company positive achievements; Likewise, student/employees who are tardy/late to class also cannot be depended on in any positive way to contribute to class or company positive achievements; Show Up. Do be on time at all times;

Do Be A Hard Worker and make this known to your coaches and your teammates by your actions, not your words. Get excited about what you are doing! Have fun working hard!

No absences = 6 points per 6 weeks; no tardies = 2 points per class period

4) Do Dress For Success by following the district’s dress code which is established to teach grooming and hygiene, prevent disruption, and minimize safety hazards. Students and parents may determine a student’s personal dress and grooming standards, provided they comply with the current student handbook sections particularly outlining the dress code. Student/Employee dress often sets the pattern for behavior. 2 points awarded for each day student does not have to be reminded that they are out of dress/grooming code

5) Do Get Caught In The Act of Having Positive And High Expectations And Expect Your Classmates To Have Positive And High Expectations Of You Because A Student/Employee Without Positive And High Expectations Is Going To Be Part of a Class/Company Expecting To Lose. Do apply yourself in the classroom; Do give your total effort, and make the most out of what you have to give; Do give of yourself unselfishly toward your classmates and to respect them; Do practice good habits to the best of your ability; Do be extremely loyal to your school, teachers, and classmates; Do be courteous; Do ALWAYS ENCOURAGE!; Do be positively emotional and positively enthusiastic. Good things happen for those who have a positive attitude. Do have self-confidence. Do learn to believe in yourself. You can do all things if you just believe. Attitude is everything – Choose a good one! If you want a positive environment, create one!  1 Point for each time week you are Caught In The Act -- this includes ...

*maintaining clean classroom, your desk area

*no discipline referrals

*being prepared for work...have a pen, pencil, paper, your laptop if needed

*display of classroom leadership

 

 

TOP 5 WORKPLACE (Classroom) THINGS (Laws) 

                                                                   TO REMEMBER & PRACTICE

1) Be at your desk once tardy bell has rung

 

2) Bring your equipment/supplies: writing utensil (pen or pencil) and paper to write on, computer, textbook (unless specifically instructed not to & it has to be covered); good attitude (do right, say right, act right)

 

3) Deposit cell phones in the proper location within the classroom (your phone will be given back at end of class)

 

4) Work is due to be turned in when it is supposed to be turned in -- LEARN HOW TO MEET A DEADLINE; an assignment will be deducted 10 points per day it is late until the only grade earned is a 0; You get a day to get assignment in for every day you are out

 

5) Be INFORMED, Get INFORMED, Stay INFORMED so you are not a Low Information Voter, Citizen, or Worse -- and be prepared to share your Information with the class

 

Characteristics Of A Good Citizen

1) You must be a hard worker – you must make this known by your actions, not only your words.

2) Good citizens have courage – courage is having the strength of character to choose the right way, even if it is the hard way.

3) You must know your classmates – you must have as many personal relationships within your class. Care for and respect every person in your class. Personality problems with others need to be tossed into the trash.

4) Good citizens must set the example. Do not be in trouble or in a negative situation all the time. It’s not hard.

5) Good citizens must accept full responsibility – if you lead and make decisions, you will occasionally make a mistake – admit it and go on. This allows people to see you as human, yet with a sense of direction and fairness.

6) Good citizens must have a positive attitude. Have self-confidence. Learn to believe in yourself. You can do all things if you just believe.

 

Instructor: Billy Nabours  830-456-9105 (Nabours’ cell)

billy.nabours@comfortisd.net or coach@ktc.com

 

COURSE OUTLINES…

U.S. Government Lessons

Instructor: Nabours

Six Weeks Timelines:

 

1st Six Weeks --- Unit 1: Political Philosophies and the U.S. Constitution.. YAGS/TEKS: G.1A, G.1B, G.1C, G.1D, G.1E, G.7A, G.7C, G.7D, G.7E, G.7F, G.7G, G.20A, G.21A, G.21B, G.21D

 

Unit 2: Celebrate Freedom Week… YAGS/TEKS: G.13A, G.13B, G.13C, G.20A, G.21D

 

CHP 1: People and Gov’t (PG. 4)

Sec. 1: Principles of Gov’t. (PG. 5)

Sec. 2: The Formation Of Gov’t (PG 12)

Sec. 3: Types Of Gov’t (PG 18)

Sec4: Economic Theories (PG 26)

 

CHP 2: Origins of American Gov’t (PG 34)

Sec. 3: The Articles of Confederation (PG 48)

Sec. 4: The Constitutional Convention (PG 53)

 

CHP 3: The Constitution (PG 62)

Sec. 1: Structure And Principles (PG 63)

Sec. 2: Three Branches Of Gov’t (PG 68)

Sec 3: Amending The Constitution (PG 76)

Sec. 4: The Amendments (PG 83)

 

 

 

2nd Six Weeks;

Unit 3: A Federalist System… YAGS/TEKS: G.7B, G.8E, G.8G, G.8H, G.9A, G.9B, G.9C, G.9D, G.12A, G.12B, G.12C, G.20A, G.21A, G.21B, G.21D

Unit 4: The Branches of the Government… YAGS/TEKS: G.1F, G.8A, G.8B, G.8C, G.8D, G.10B, G.10C, G.13D, G.13E, G.13F, G.20A, G.21D

 

CHP 5: The Organization Process (PG 122)

Sec. 2: The House of Representatives (PG 132)

Sec. 2: The Senate (PG 138)

 

CHP 7: Congress At Work (PG 180)

Sec 1:  How a Bill Becomes A Law (PG 181)

 

CHP 8:  The Presidency (PG 212)

Sec 1:  President And Vice President (PG 213)

 

CHP 9: Presidential Leadership (PG 244)

Sec 1:  Presidential Powers (PG 245)

3rd Six Weeks:

Unit 5: Governmental Policies.. YAGS/TEKS: G.4A, G.4B, G.5A, G.5B, G.5C, G.5D, G.6A, G.6B, G.8F, G.17A, G.17B, G.18A, G.18B, G.20A, G.21A, G.21B, G.21D

 

Unit 6: The Political Process… YAGS/TEKS: G.2A, G.2B, G.3A, G.3B, G.3C, G.10A, G.11A, G.11B, G.11C, G.14A, G.14B, G.14C, G.14D, G.15A, G.15B, G.15C, G.16A, G.16B, G.19A, G.19B, G.20A, G.20B, G.21D

 

 

CHP 11: The Federal Court System (PG 304)

Sec 1:  Powers of the Federal Courts (PG 305)

Sec 2:  Lower federal Courts (PG 312)

Sec 3: The Supreme Court (PG 320)

 

CHP 13: Constitutional Freedoms (PG 354)

Sec. 1: Constitutional Rights (PG 355)

 

CHP 14: Citizenship And Equal Justice (PG 386)

Sec. 1: A Nation of Immigrants (PG 387)

Sec. 2: The Basis of Citizenship (PG 391)

 

Text/Major Resources:

            United States Government Glencoe McGraw-Hill)

            Appropriate videos for viewing, testing

            Projects

Grading System:

            Homework, Daily assignments –60%

            Tests, Quizzes, Projects – 40%

TutoringTime:

            Available to students on as needed basis

Assessments based on grades from homework, tests, major projects, class participation, etc…

Lesson Plan:

            All major projects will utilize computer/internet use and LMC time in addition to standard sources and materials

            Weekly lesson plans submitted electronically; copies available upon request

Homework Policy:

  • A student who is absent because of illness or family emergency is expected to make up their homework in the appropriate number of days equal to their absence
  • Homework is expected to be turned in on the day it is due
  • Homework will not be accepted after the third day of the missed deadline and the maximum grade will be a 70

Discipline Plan:

  • Students are expected to be on time for class
  • Students are expected to bring appropriate supplies to class everyday
  • Students are expected to stay in their seat during class unless otherwise noted
  • Students are expected to respect their classmates, teacher, classroom guests and to act in accordance with the traits of good citizenship
  • Follow the policy handbook

 

Gov’t Special Projects:

ID: Current SCOTUS/Who appointed?

TX district courts/where located?

            Speaker of the House/Senate Majority Leader

            Majority leaders/Minority leaders

 

# of Illegals Immigrants for latest year available (2012,2014,etc...)

Patriot Act

 

Early pres salaries

# of Senators/Guvs as President

# of Pres killed in office

Pres died in office of natural causes

 

Texas Voting % for:

            Decades 60s;70s;80s;90s;2000-2009; 2010-2014

                        Last 3 Governor elections: 2004-2008-2014

                        Last 3 Presidential elections: 2004-2008-2012

DOJ challenges SCOTUS ruling for Texas Voter ID Law

 

National % for Presidential elections 

            Decades/Years 1960-64-68

       1972-76

       1980-84-88

                         1992-96

                                  2000-04-08-16

 

Investigate Local Gov’t:

*Why doesn’t Comfort have a city gov’t?

*Prepare a brochure over the following:

  1. State Reps/Sens to D.C.

Our District Reps/Sens to Austin

Political & 3rd Parties In America/Origins/Platforms:

Whig, Democrat-Republican, Democrat, Republican, Populist, Progressive, Bull Moose, American, Green, Reform, Libertarian, etc...

 

*WHY DOESN’T AMERICA HAVE MORE 3rd PARTIES?

*WHICH 3rd PARTIES HAVE BEEN THE 3 MOST SUCCESSFUL?

 

Memorize Preamble to Constitution

ID SCOTUS Cases: include DOMA, Prop 8,

 

U.S. History Syllabus/Lessons

Instructor: Nabours

 

U.S. History Since 1877

Course Description: In this course students study the history of the United States since 1877 to the present. Content focuses on political, economic, and social events and issues related to various periods of America’s time. Emphasis is also targeted on geographic factors that influenced U.S. development. Students will examine, analyze, describe and discuss the U.S. Constitution and its impact on American society.

Major Learner Outcomes:

  • HISTORY – Students identify, analyze, explain and apply traditional historical points of reference, and political, economic, and social changes in the United States from 1877 to the present
  • HISTORY – Students explain, identify, analyze, and evaluate the emergence of the United States as a world power beginning with involvement in the Spanish-American War
  • HISTORY – Students describe and analyze the impact of significant national and international decisions and conflicts from WW II and the Cold War to the present, including Korea and Vietnam
  • HISTORY – Students identify and evaluate the impact of the American civil rights movement, including leaders, government efforts at change, and changes as the result of the movement
  • Geography – Students analyze the impact of geographic factors on major events
  • GEOGRAPHY – Students identify and trace the relationship between population growth and modernization on the physical environment
  • ECONOMICS – Students analyze, evaluate, describe, compare and identify significant developments related to U.S. economic growth from the 1870s to the present
  • GOVERNMENT – Students evaluate, explain, predict, and analyze changes in the role of government over time
  • GOVERNMENT – Students analyze, identify, and evaluate the impact of constitutional issues on American society
  • GOVERNMENT – Students identify and evaluate efforts to expand the American democratic process
  • CITIZENSHIP – Students describe and evaluate the importance of effective leadership in a democratic society
  • CULTURE – Students describe, identify, analyze, and explain the relationship between the arts and the time periods during which they were created
  • CULTURE – Students identify political, social and economic contributions of various groups to American society
  • SCIENCE/TECHNOLOGY/SOCIETY – Students explain the impact of science and technology on the development of the United States

 

 

U.S. HISTORY Timelines:

1st Six Weeks

Unit 1: Growing Pains – The Gilded Age 1877-1898…YAGS/TEKS: US.2A, US.2B, US.2C, US.3A, US.3B, US.3C, US.3D, US.5C, US.12A, US.13A, US.13B, US.14A, US.15A, US.15C, US.24B, US.26B, US.27A, US.27B, US.27C, US.28A, US.29B, US.29G, US.30A, US.30B, US.31A

 

Review Ch. 3 Industrialization 1865-1901

Lesson 1 The Rise of Industry; Lesson 2 The Railroads; Lesson 3 Big Business;    

Lesson 4 Unions

 

Review Ch. 4 Urban America, 1865-1896

Lesson 1 Immigration; Lesson 2 Urbanization; Lesson 4 Politics of the Gilded Age; Lesson 5 The Rise of Segregation

 

Unit 2: Celebrate Freedom Week… YAGS/TEKS: US.1A, US.1B, US.1C, US.22A, US.22B, US.22C, US.26E, US.29B, US.30A

 

2nd Six Weeks:

Unit 3: Reforming America – The Progressive Era 1898-1920… YAGS/TEKS: US.2B, US.2C, US.5A, US.5B, US.5C, US.9A, US.14B, US.15B, US.15E, US.23A, US.23B, US.23C, US.25A, US.26A, US.26D, US.29B, US.29G, US.30A, US.30B

 

Review Ch. 6 The Progressive Movement, 1890-1920

Lesson 1 The Roots of Progressivism; Lesson 2 Roosevelt and Taft;

Lesson 3 The Wilson Years

 

Unit 4: Emergence As A World Power –1898-1920… Spanish-American & World War I … YAGS/TEKS: US.2B, US.2C, US.2D, US.4A, US.4B, US.4C, US.4D, US.4E, US.4F, US.4G, US.12A, US.12B, US.15C, US.15D, US.19B, US.19E, US.26F, US.27B, US.29B, US.29G, US.30A

 

Review Ch. 5 Becoming a World Power, 1872-1917

Lesson 1 The Imperialist Vision; Lesson 2 The Spanish-American War;

Lesson 3 New American Diplomacy

 

Review Ch. 7 World war I and Its Aftermath, 1914-1920

Lesson 1 The United States Enters WW I; Lesson 2 The Home Front

Lesson 3 A Bloody Conflict;  Lesson 4 The War’s Impact

 

 

3rd Six Weeks:

Unit 5: Boom Time 1920s…YAGS/TEKS:US.2B, US.2C, US.2D, US.6A, US.6B, US.9A, US.13A, US.15C, US.16A, US.19C, US.23B, US.25A, US.25B, US.25C, US.26B, US.26C, US.27C, US.28A, US.29B, US.30A

 

Review Ch. 8 The Jazz Age, 1920-1929

Lesson 1 The Politics of the 1920s;    Lesson 2 A Growing Economy;

Lesson 3 A Clash of Values;              Lesson 4 Cultural Innovations;

Lesson 5 African American Culture and Politics

 

 

Unit 6: Economic Bust.. The Great Depression 1929-1939… YAGS/TEKS: US.2B, US.2D, US.12A, US.13A, US.14A, US.16B, US.16C, US.16D, US.16E, US.19A, US.19B, US.20B, US.25A, US.29B, US.29G, US.30A, US.30C

 

Review Ch. 9 The Great Depression Begins, 1929-1932

Lesson 1 The Causes of the Great Depression;

Lesson 2 Life During The Great Depression;

Lesson 3 Hoover’s Response to the Depression

 

Review Ch. 10 Roosevelt and the New Deal, 1933-1941

Lesson 1 The First New Deal;  Lesson 2 The Second New Deal;

Lesson 3 The New Deal Coalition

 

 

4th Six Weeks:

Unit 7: Total War… 1939-1945.. World War II.. YAGS/TEKS.. US.2B, US.2C, US.2D, US.7A, US.7B, US.7C, US.7D, US.7E, US.7F, US.7G, US.12B, US.17A, US.19B, US.21B, US.24A, US.26F, US.29B, US.29E, US.30A, US.30C

Review Ch. 12 America and World War II, 1941-1945

Lesson 1 Wartime America;    Lesson 2 The War In The Pacific

Lesson 3 The War In Europe; Lesson 4 The War Ends

Unit 8: Differing Ideologies.. 1945-1970s… The Cold War… YAGS/TEKS… US.2B, US.2C, US.2D, US.8A, US.8B, US.8C, US.8D, US.8E, US.8F, US.14A, US.17B, US.17C, US.19B, US.20A, US.21A, US.21B, US.23B, US.25A, US.25B, US.26E, US.26F, US.27A, US.27B, US.28B, US.29B, US.29G, US.30A, US.30C

 

Review Ch. 13 The Cold War Begins, 1945-1960

Lesson 1 The Origins of the Cold War;  Lesson 3 The Cold War & American Society

 

Review Ch. 14 Postwar America, 1945-1960

Lesson 2 The Affluent Society; Lesson 3 The Other Side of American Life

 

Review Ch. 17 The Vietnam War, 1954-1975

Lesson 1 Going to war in Vietnam;    Lesson 2 Vietnam Divides The Nation;

Lesson 3 The War Winds Down

 

5th Six Weeks:

Unit 9: Liberty & Justice For All…1945-1970s… Civil Rights Movement..YAGS/TEKS: US.2B, US.2C, US.2D, US.9A, US.9B, US.9C, US.9D, US.9E, US.9F, US.9G, US.9H, US.9I, US.17D, US.21A, US.21B, US.21C, US.23A, US.23B, US.24A, US.24B, US.26A, US.26C, US.26D, US.29B, US.29E, US.29G, US.30A

           

Review Ch. 16 The Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1968

Lesson 1 The Movement Begins; Lesson 2 Challenging Segregation;

Lesson 3 New Civil Rights Issues

 

Unit 10: A Growing World Presence 1970-1990. New National Directions…YAGS/TEKS US.2B, US.2C, US.10A, US.10B, US.10C, US.10D, US.10E, US.10F, US.11B, US.13A, US.14B, US.17E, US.19C, US.19D, US.24B, US.29B, US.30A

 

Review Ch. 18 The Politics of Protest, 1960-1980

Lesson 1 Students and the Counterculture;    Lesson 2 The Feminist Movement;

Lesson 3 Latino Americans Organize

 

6th Six Weeks:

Unit 11: A New Century Turns 1990s – to Present Day..YAGS/TEKS… US.2B, US.2C, US.2D, US.11A, US.11C, US.11D, US.11E, US.11F, US.12A, US.13B, US.14C, US.17E, US.18A, US.18B, US.19B, US.19C, US.19D, US.19E, US.20B, US.24B, US.25C, US.25D, US.26D, US.27C, US.28A, US.28C, US.29B, US.29G, US.30A

 

Unit 12: Ever Changing America – Yesterdays Challenges and Today’s Opportunities: YAGS/TEKS…US.2A, US.2B, US.2C, US.2D, US.29B, US.29C

 

 

 

 

And if time allows…

Review Ch. 1, Creating a Nation, Beginnings to 1877:

Lesson 2 The Young Republic;           Lesson 4 The Sectional Crisis;           

Lesson 5 The Civil War and Reconstruction

 

Review Ch. 2, Settling the West, 1865-1890:

Lesson 1 Miners and Ranchers;          Lesson 2 Farming the Plains

Lesson 3 Native Americans

Text/Major Resources:

            United States History Glencoe McGraw-Hill)

            Appropriate videos for viewing, testing

            Projects

Grading System:

            Homework, Daily assignments – 60%

            Tests, Quizzes, Projects – 40%

Tutoring Time:

            Available to students on as needed basis

Assessments based on grades from homework, tests, major projects, class participation, etc…

Lesson Plan:

            All major projects will utilize computer/internet use and LMC time in addition to standard sources and materials

            Weekly lesson plans submitted electronically; copies available upon request

Homework Policy:

  • A student who is absent because of illness or family emergency is expected to make up their homework in the appropriate number of days equal to their absence
  • Homework is expected to be turned in on the day it is due
  • Homework will not be accepted after the third day of the missed deadline and the maximum grade will be a 70

Discipline Plan:

  • Students are expected to be on time for class
  • Students are expected to bring appropriate supplies to class everyday
  • Students are expected to stay in their seat during class unless otherwise noted
  • Students are expected to respect their classmates, teacher, classroom guests and to act in accordance with the traits of good citizenship
  • Follow the policy handbook

U.S. HISTORY SPECIAL PROJECTS

1) 9-11 Interview/Memories of the Day

“We Will (Should) Never Forget”

Students are to interview one adult person – preferably a parent, grandparent, or someone who will remember where they were, what they were doing, and how they reacted to the attacks on 9-11 at the World Trade Center in New York.

Students will ask their question(s) and either write neatly or type the response(s). If writing, please use regular lined notebook paper and if typing please single space. All interviews must include a title of some kind. All interviews will eventually be filed together into a sort of United States History class 9-11 memory book.

You may also include one (1) photo clip from 9-11 with your interview paper if you wish.

All interviews are due either written (legible)or typed

Do your best and please do not treat this assignment lightly. It will be recorded twice, once as a daily grade and once as a test grade.

2) 100 YEARS ASSIGNMENT

 In 100 years there are thousands of stories waiting to be told about the United States, Texas, Comfort, and the World.

 This assignment is an opportunity to go back, decade by decade, and tell those stories, in the form of news stories, book reviews, gossip columns, obituaries, letters, and timelines, video, or power points and create something that details the particular history of your selected year.

 To make the assignment even more interesting, it will not be “your parents’ history.” EXAMPLES: 1) Everyone knows that in 1941 the United States was drawn into World War II when Pearl Harbor was bombed by the Japanese, but what about the rest of that year, or other years wrapped around 1941, 1940, 1942?

  What about 1939? 2) What about 1911, the year before the Titanic decided to go down and never come up? The biggies are always covered in the usual textbooks, but what if... you had a time machine that was really more of a beaten up car ---- not entirely reliable, not always landing in the “right” years ---- those years usually spotlighted in all history classes?

 So, the class will have a container that has 100 pieces of paper in it, each containing a year that will, in some way, be encompassed in this year’s study of U.S. History. Everyone will draw a year out of the container.

 You are on orders to “do anything appropriate” about your chosen year, so get curious regarding the following criteria ---- persons of interest born/died; fashions; government and politics; entertainment; school systems, including when established, course offerings, organizations through the years; sports; social traditions; wartime/peacetime, etc...

 Read reference books, scour website timelines. Use the library to your fullest potential. You can even interview individuals in the community if they are willing to be interviewed. The assignment may seem broad ---- to write, create, and visually depict anything that occurred in your selected year, in whatever tone seems suitable and the instructor deems appropriate.

 What the class will wind up with is a kind of sideways look at history. It’s not the Wikipedia, but it’s a good start.

One thing you will learn: The United States of America, Texas, Comfort, and the World will always be works in progress. There will be some fascinating stories to be told and illustrations to be looked at.

3) ORAL HISTORY PROJECT

 Storytelling is one of the primary ways information about one’s culture is handed down through generations. Oral histories are just one kind of story that can be told.

 This assignment will allow you to seek out older persons ---- over age 50 ---grandparents or other relatives, military veterans, etc...; and have them tell you those stories. You will capture their stories on either audio or videotape, but only after securing their permission to do so.

 You will need to begin your interview with at least 5 basic questions that help kick things off: 1) name of person being interviewed; 2) their age; 3) what kind of history/story do you have to share with our U.S. History class; 4) historically speaking, have things changed for the better during your lifetime; 5) what is the most memorable historical event that has occurred during your lifetime?

 Oral histories are to be at least 15 minutes and no longer except when special permission is granted.

 

**Places to seek out information ---- assisted living centers, VFW, church, etc...

 

4) TEXAS ON THE DEFENSIVE

 Locate where the military/defense communities are found within the state’s borders – both present facilities and some that are now closed or on reduced capacity:

 1) Explain their history

2) ID the factors that led to their establishment

3) List economic positives and negatives brought about from the establishment of the respective military post

4) Explain demographic changes for the surrounding communities located within the immediate vicinity of the respective military post, expanding on the history of the community itself before, during, and since the establishment of the military presence

FACTORS TO THINK ABOUT:

1) Determine what one local military establishment means to a local community in economic terms; how much does it mean to communities within close proximity?

2) In addition to military posts, in what other ways has Texas benefitted from military and Depart of Defense presence within the state

3) Texas’ own military contributions to the country

 

6) TIME TRAVEL, INC

Pretend you are a travel agent for “History-Is-Us” or any time-travel company and you are offering a special deal to time travelers wanting a fun and exciting destination for that historically relaxing vacation.

 Your assignment is to create the most interesting, informative, and intellectually stimulating brochure for history buffs of all ages, sizes, shapes, colors, and genders. In your brochure be sure to spotlight things of interest and things to do, plus any hidden dangers to watch out for (Sitting Bull and the Sioux Nation are an example for those traveling back to the time of the wars against the Plains Indians).

 You can create your brochure off desktop publisher, power point, or for a more authentic and historical edge you might make one using construction paper and sketches or something similar to what you might imagine a time travel brochure would include pertaining to your particular time period.

 Include: 1) interesting historical site, dates, persons of interest; 2) Things to do; 3) Hidden dangers; 4) Costs, where time travelers can stay, and for how long can they stay in the time period vacation; 5) Why you are offering the particular time period.

 Remember the following time periods are available for the right price:

1776-1800

1800-1930

1830-1860

1860-1890

1890-1920

1980-2010

2010-2018

1920-1950

1950-1980